Where attention goes, energy flows…

Mindfulness Practices

A Formal Practice

An Informal Practice

Practices of the Heart

You don’t have to be a Yogi or Buddhist to practise mindfulness.  It is a secular (non-religious) practice and is becoming more available throughout our communities, for anyone, at just about any age and walk of life.

 

See Who Practices Mindfulness?

 

Mindfulness can be considered a simplified form of meditation but you don’t have to sit crossed legged or even sit at all.  Mindfulness is simply the state of being “aware” and it can happen anywhere, anytime, with a still body or moving body, for as much or as little time as desired.

 

Practicing mindfulness can be a more formal experience, or an informal experience and generally includes practices of the heart (compassion, kindness, empathy, gratitude).

Mindfulness is one of the most powerful ways to still the waters made rough by rumination over past pain, and future speculation about pain that may never even happen. Mindfulness is the reset button that brings us back to now and Helen's program is an excellent way to make your way to it.

 

- Jocelyn, Head of Guidance Sacred Heart Catholic School

Intentionally setting time aside to practise mindfulness is considered a more formal practice and can be done sitting, walking, or lying down.

 

This formal practice of mindfulness is just really the notion of placing your attention somewhere and when your attention shifts, simply bringing it back.

 

Where can you place your attention?  Often it is on your breath because your breath is with you all of the time, but anything can be a point of focus like sounds, or sensations in the body.

 

At first you may find your mind wander a lot and it is easy to make the judgement that you are doing this wrong or it is not working.  Instead, we want to create a kind attitude of accepting this experience just as it is.

 

During this formal practice we are not trying to suppress thoughts and clear the mind, rather just notice our thoughts without identifying with them, and just notice the experience unfold.

Practising becoming attentive to the present moment anywhere and anytime during the day is considered a more informal mindfulness practice.  Anything from washing your hands, to eating a meal, to walking your child to school, or communicating with a business associate can be experienced more fully, more thoughtfully, and in many cases with more skill and wisdom.

 

With practice, we can encounter more “states” or moments of mindfulness throughout our day.  This can lead to mindfulness being more of a “trait” that we can acquire; we become more mindful as a person even without consciously trying.

Mindfulness training is not complete without a focus on qualities of the heart including kindness, gratitude, compassion and empathy.

 

At Mindful Well-Being Helen includes these practices with mindfulness training, helping you to bring a kind-hearted approach to your daily experiences and relationships with others and yourself.

CONTACT

 

(905) 464-4798

helen@mindfulwell-being.ca

Copyright © 2019 Mindful Well-Being. All Rights Reserved.

Mindfulness Practices

You don’t have to be a Yogi or Buddhist to practise mindfulness.  It is a secular (non-religious) practice and is becoming more available throughout our communities, for anyone, at just about any age and walk of life.

 

See Who Practices Mindfulness?

 

Mindfulness can be considered a simplified form of meditation but you don’t have to sit crossed legged or even sit at all.  Mindfulness is simply the state of being “aware” and it can happen anywhere, anytime, with a still body or moving body, for as much or as little time as desired.

 

Practicing mindfulness can be a more formal experience, or an informal experience and generally includes practices of the heart (compassion, kindness, empathy, gratitude).

Mindfulness is one of the most powerful ways to still the waters made rough by rumination over past pain, and future speculation about pain that may never even happen. Mindfulness is the reset button that brings us back to now and Helen's program is an excellent way to make your way to it.

 

- Jocelyn, Head of Guidance Sacred Heart Catholic School

A Formal Practice

Intentionally setting time aside to practise mindfulness is considered a more formal practice and can be done sitting, walking, or lying down.

 

This formal practice of mindfulness is just really the notion of placing your attention somewhere and when your attention shifts, simply bringing it back.

Where can you place your attention?  Often it is on your breath because your breath is with you all of the time, but anything can be a point of focus like sounds, or sensations in the body.

 

At first you may find your mind wander a lot and it is easy to make the judgement that you are doing this wrong or it is not working.  Instead, we want to create a kind attitude of accepting this experience just as it is.

 

During this formal practice we are not trying to suppress thoughts and clear the mind, rather just notice our thoughts without identifying with them, and just notice the experience unfold.

An Informal Practice

Practising becoming attentive to the present moment anywhere and anytime during the day is considered a more informal mindfulness practice.  Anything from washing your hands, to eating a meal, to walking your child to school, or communicating with a business associate can be experienced more fully, more thoughtfully, and in many cases with more skill and wisdom.

 

With practice, we can encounter more “states” or moments of mindfulness throughout our day.  This can lead to mindfulness being more of a “trait” that we can acquire; we become more mindful as a person even without consciously trying.

Practices of the Heart

Mindfulness training is not complete without a focus on qualities of the heart including kindness, gratitude, compassion and empathy.

 

At Mindful Well-Being Helen includes these practices with mindfulness training, helping you to bring a kind-hearted approach to your daily experiences and relationships with others and yourself.