Neurons that fire together, wire together…

Mindfulness and the Changing Brain

New Discoveries about the Brain

 

It was not until the latter half of the 20th century that scientists discovered the neuroplasticity of the brain.  We now know that throughout its lifespan, the brain is continually changing in response to one’s lifestyle, emotions, thoughts, physiology and environment; and, you can take more control over these changes.

The more you focus and practice something, the better you get at it.  This is a result of new neural pathways that form because of your learning efforts, “neurons which fire together, wire together”.  At the same time, your brain is also eliminating pathways that are no longer needed and this is called synaptic pruning.

 

Mindfulness and Neuroplasticity

 

Learning and practising mindfulness can change your brain.  For instance, if you have a history of anxiety, some of your neural pathways have become wired for anxiety.  The more you experience and feed the anxiety, the stronger these pathways become.   With mindfulness training you can develop new pathways which can lead to feeling more calm and peaceful more of the time. Your brain recognizes these new pathways being used more often and “prunes” away the older anxiety pathways.

 

Through the practice of mindfulness, having more awareness of our thoughts, emotions, and body sensations can give us the space needed to review our intentions in life.  Whether it is to control our temper, have healthier eating habits, improve relationships, get more exercise or alleviate anxiety, the first step is always pausing and becoming aware of what is happening in that instant.  This is called a “mindful moment”, and it is necessary to make wise decisions, or have thoughtful responses towards the intentions you have identified.  This can be learned and practised and as a result, our brain can change with this familiarity.

"The invitation in all of this work is that we can take more responsibility for our own brains. And shape our brains wittingly in a more intentional way by cultivating more healthy habits of mind."

 

- Richard Davidson,

Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin–Madison as well as Founder and Chair of the Center for Healthy Minds.

Mindfulness and How the Brain Works

CONTACT

 

(905) 464-4798

helen@mindfulwell-being.ca

Copyright © 2019 Mindful Well-Being. All Rights Reserved.

Mindfulness and the Changing Brain

New Discoveries about the Brain

 

It was not until the latter half of the 20th century that scientists discovered the neuroplasticity of the brain.  We now know that throughout its lifespan, the brain is continually changing in response to one’s lifestyle, emotions, thoughts, physiology and environment; and, you can take more control over these changes.

The more you focus and practice something, the better you get at it.  This is a result of new neural pathways that form because of your learning efforts, “neurons which fire together, wire together”.  At the same time, your brain is also eliminating pathways that are no longer needed and this is called synaptic pruning.

Mindfulness and Neuroplasticity

 

Learning and practising mindfulness can change your brain.  For instance, if you have a history of anxiety, some of your neural pathways have become wired for anxiety.  The more you experience and feed the anxiety, the stronger these pathways become.   With mindfulness training you can develop new pathways which can lead to feeling more calm and peaceful more of the time. Your brain recognizes these new pathways being used more often and “prunes” away the older anxiety pathways.

 

Through the practice of mindfulness, having more awareness of our thoughts, emotions, and body sensations can give us the space needed to review our intentions in life.  Whether it is to control our temper, have healthier eating habits, improve relationships, get more exercise or alleviate anxiety, the first step is always pausing and becoming aware of what is happening in that instant.  This is called a “mindful moment”, and it is necessary to make wise decisions, or have thoughtful responses towards the intentions you have identified.  This can be learned and practised and as a result, our brain can change with this familiarity.

"The invitation in all of this work is that we can take more responsibility for our own brains. And shape our brains wittingly in a more intentional way by cultivating more healthy habits of mind."

 

- Richard Davidson,

Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin–Madison as well as Founder and Chair of the Center for Healthy Minds.

Mindfulness and How the Brain Works