Paying attention to what you are thinking, feeling and doing...

What is mindfulness?

Why is mindfulness relevant?

Mindfulness is the awareness that emerges through paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally.

 

— Jon Kabat-Zinn (Professor of Medicine Emeritus, University of Massachusetts Medical School)

Essentially, mindfulness is purposefully bringing awareness to one's experience.  You have likely been mindful of something you were doing or feeling at some point in your life.  To further connect with this idea, here is an example of being mindful…

Imagine yourself walking on slippery rocks to get across a river.  Your attention would be in the present moment, intentionally looking at each rock, carefully choosing where to place your foot, and pacing yourself accordingly - being mindful of every step you take.

You can learn to bring this same quality of attention to your daily life; paying attention to what you see, hear, feel, smell, taste, as well as your thoughts and emotions.

 

Contact Mindful Well-Being for more information.

There are two ways to live your life: one is as though nothing is a miracle, the other is as though everything is a miracle.

 

– Albert Einstein

How much time do you spend thinking in the past about regrets, memories, or anticipating, worrying about the future?  Our minds are easily distracted and we have habits of thinking that do not always serve us well.

 

Practising mindfulness allows us to pay attention to what is happening in the present moment which can bring more awareness of what is happening in our life.  For instance, we can learn to recognize the thoughts we are having and in doing so, we learn how our minds work, and if we should trust those thoughts.  This same awareness can happen with everything we do, and feel.

This awareness allows for an opportunity to make choices that are more wise, healthy, compassionate and altruistic. By responding true to our values instead of reacting impulsively, we can make decisions which benefit our well-being and the well-being of others.

 

Contact Mindful Well-Being for more information.

By focusing on the here and now, many people who practice mindfulness find that they are less likely to get caught up in worries about the future or regrets over the past, are less preoccupied with concerns about success and self-esteem, and are better able to form deep connections with others.

 

- Harvard Health Publications

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Copyright © 2019 Mindful Well-Being. All Rights Reserved.

What is Mindfulness?

Mindfulness is the awareness that emerges through paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally.

 

— Jon Kabat-Zinn (Professor of Medicine Emeritus, University of Massachusetts Medical School)

Essentially, mindfulness is purposefully bringing awareness to one's experience.  You have likely been mindful of something you were doing or feeling at some point in your life.  To further connect with this idea, here is an example of being mindful…

Imagine yourself walking on slippery rocks to get across a river.  Your attention would be in the present moment, intentionally looking at each rock, carefully choosing where to place your foot, and pacing yourself accordingly - being mindful of every step you take.

You can learn to bring this same quality of attention to your daily life; paying attention to what you see, hear, feel, smell, taste, as well as your thoughts and emotions.

 

Contact Mindful Well-Being for more information.

There are two ways to live your life: one is as though nothing is a miracle, the other is as though everything is a miracle.

 

– Albert Einstein

Why is Mindfulness relevant?

How much time do you spend thinking in the past about regrets, memories, or anticipating, worrying about the future?  Our minds are easily distracted and we have habits of thinking that do not always serve us well.

 

Practising mindfulness allows us to pay attention to what is happening in the present moment which can bring more awareness of what is happening in our life.  For instance, we can learn to recognize the thoughts we are having and in doing so, we learn how our minds work, and if we should trust those thoughts.  This same awareness can happen with everything we do, and feel.

This awareness allows for an opportunity to make choices that are more wise, healthy, compassionate and altruistic. By responding true to our values instead of reacting impulsively, we can make decisions which benefit our well-being and the well-being of others.

 

Contact Mindful Well-Being for more information.

By focusing on the here and now, many people who practice mindfulness find that they are less likely to get caught up in worries about the future or regrets over the past, are less preoccupied with concerns about success and self-esteem, and are better able to form deep connections with others.

 

- Harvard Health Publications